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New Heritage Trail for Downtown's Westside > Potential Star Attractions


As we design our next urban heritage trail, your thoughts and opinions are extremely important. We rely on the community to help shape this trail.

The list below contains brief histories of historic buildings and cultural attractions within the focus area of the trail. As you review the histories, share with us what sites are important to downtown’s westside. You can let us know by email or using the "Contact Us" feature at the top left side of the website. Feel free to select up to no more than 10 sites. Please let us know your choices no later than June 2, 2014. Thanks for being part of the trail planning!



Each site lists an address, the architect (if known), date of construction, and a site description. It is also noted if the site holds a special designation.  Baltimore City Landmark and listing on the National Register of Historic Places are the most common designations. A handful of sites also hold the distinction of being National Historic Landmarks.

 



Babe Ruth Museum and Birthplace
216 Emory Street
Architect Unknown (Built around 1875)
Babe Ruth was born at 216 Emory Street, the home of his maternal grandparents, in 1895. The renovation of the house was one of the most broad-based preservation efforts undertaken in Baltimore. Mayor Theodore R. McKeldin initiated the project in 1967, and in 1969, the city had bought the house and the three decaying, neighboring properties. The house was officially opened to the public on July 29, 1974. Today the complex of four buildings contains period furnishings and an extensive collection of Babe Ruth memorabilia.
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Baltimore Equitable Society
21 N. Eutaw Street
Joseph F. Kemp (1857)
The building once occupied by the Baltimore Equitable Society is representative of an almost lost architectural genre: mid-19th century commercial structures. This handsome Italian Renaissance building was the original home to the Eutaw Savings Bank. In 1889, the bank sold the building to the Baltimore Equitable Society, an insurance company that kept its offices in the building for more than a century. The society was the first fire insurance company in Baltimore and the oldest corporation in Maryland. The site is now home to the popular Alewife restaurant.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Baltimore General Dispensary
500 W. Fayette Street
George McKenzie (1911)
The Baltimore General Dispensary Building is the only surviving building designed for Baltimore’s oldest charity. Its design reflects its use by a prominent social institution and has an interesting mix of neoclassical and commercial styles. The Baltimore General Dispensary was formed in 1801 to provide medical and health care services for Baltimore’s poor. Considered a model of its kind for its era, this building featured a large dispensary center on the first floor, separated for black and white patients. The rooms for surgical and medical aid on the second floor gave the poor a measure of privacy rarely available to charity patients. The fine neoclassical details on the exterior distinguish this rather small building as a place of importance in the city. It is modest in scale, reflecting its service to Baltimore’s poor, yet its neoclassical styling relates to the dispensary’s long-standing position as a well-known institution.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Baltimore Grand
401 W. Fayette Street
Charles Carson, Baldwin & Pennington, and Haskell & Barnes (1881, 1887)
The Baltimore Grand occupies two historic bank buildings: the former Western National Bank and the former Eutaw Savings Bank. The buildings were connected in 1989 and adaptively reused to create a commercial catering and banquet facility adjacent to the Hippodrome Theater. The buildings represent a type of small-scale, yet richly detailed and monumental structures characteristic of Baltimore’s financial institutions around the turn of the 20th century.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Bread of Life Cathedral
100 W. Franklin Street
Robert Carey Long, Jr. (1847)
Now the Bread of Life Cathedral, the church was originally the Franklin Street Presbyterian Church, which was organized in 1844. Designed in the Tudor Gothic style, it was one of the first major buildings in Baltimore to break from the neoclassical architecture. It is also noted as a significant Gothic Revival landmark in American architecture.
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Brewer’s Exchange
20 Park Avenue
Joseph Sperry (1896)
This Renaissance Revival style building was built as a center for negotiating supplies used in the beer brewing industry. The architectural details are striking: the fluted columns, swag-motifed cornice, and foliated panels and surrounds are executed in terra cotta.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower
21 S. Eutaw Street
Joseph Sperry (1911)
Baltimore’s iconic Emerson Bromo Seltzer Tower stands as a symbol of the city and the new Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District. Inspired by the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy, the 15-story building was the tallest in Baltimore until the 1930s.The tower was built for the founder of the Emerson Drug Company, Captain Isaac E. Emerson. The tower was originally topped with a large replica of the blue Bromo Seltzer bottle, which was illuminated at night and became a notable landmark for ships entering the Baltimore harbor. This bottle was removed in the 1930s, but the clock, the largest four-dial gravity clock in the world, remains.
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Davidge Hall
522 W. Lombard Street
Robert Carey Long, Sr. (1812)
The first building on the University of Maryland’s Baltimore Campus, Davidge Hall is the oldest structure in the nation in continuous use for medical education. It is named for Dr. John Beale Davidge, anatomist and surgeon, who received a charter to establish the College of Medicine of Maryland in l807. The Pantheon-style building is unique with two circular amphitheaters under its wooden dome.  Today the building contains classrooms and offices.
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK
NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK

Congress Hotel (Kernan Hotel)
306-312 W. Franklin Street
John Allen (1904)
The Congress Hotel is one of the finest hotel buildings built in downtown Baltimore. In 1904, Philadelphia architect John D. Allen designed the Congress Hotel— originally the Hotel Kernan—as part of a million dollar entertainment complex which also included the Maryland Theater and the Auditorium Theater. From 1905 until the late 1920s, the Kernan was a focal point of Baltimore’s social life. The richly detailed architecture is French Renaissance Revival, and the hotel is one of two remaining early 20th-century palace hotels.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Baltimore Arena
201 W. Baltimore Street
A.G. Odell, Jr. (1961)
The Baltimore Arena is the city’s largest indoor sports and entertainment facility. The arena opened in 1962 as the Baltimore Civic Center. Several sports teams have called the arena home, ranging from basketball’s Baltimore Bullets (1963-73) to the American Hockey League’s Baltimore Clippers (1962-77). Over the years, the arena hosted some of the greatest names in entertainment, including the Beatles, Led Zepplin, the Grateful Dead, Luciano Pavarotti, Bruce Springsteen, and the Rolling Stones. The arena has also been used for large gatherings, such as 1966’s Methodist clergy meeting at which Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke.

Camden Station
301 W. Camden Street
Joseph F. Kemp (1856)
Opened in 1856, Camden Station served as the grand passenger terminus for the B&O Railroad, the country's first commercial railroad. For a period of time it dominated Baltimore's skyline as the city's tallest building, as it was designed to be taller than the Washington Monument. Camden Station itself is an historic artifact, as the first blood of the Civil War was shed outside the station's northern portals on Pratt Street. Abraham Lincoln also passed through the building on several occasions, once on his way to Gettysburg.

In 1971, the B&O vacated the building. Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards opened to the public on May 14, 2005. Sports Legends occupies the basement and first floor of the station. The second floor is home to Geppi’s Entertainment Museum.

Erlanger Buildings
519-531 W. Pratt Street
John Lafferty (1892)
The Erlanger Buildings are significant examples of loft industrial architecture in Baltimore from 1890-1910. Within the four-building complex are a variety of architectural styles from Victorian-era loft buildings with fine details and cast-iron columns to later structures, characterized primarily by large windows. Historically, the buildings are significant as the home of the Erlanger Manufacturing Company, which produced BVD brand underwear. Charles Erlanger, co-founder of the company, is credited with making major advances in the design of underwear which revolutionized the industry.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Faust Brothers Building
301 W. Baltimore Street
Benjamin Bennett (1870)
When constructed in 1870, the Faust Brothers Building incorporated the latest innovations in building construction methods and materials. The building is one of less than 100 cast-iron front buildings remaining in the city and the only known building with two cast-iron façades. The Faust Brothers Building stands as a physical reminder of Baltimore’s prominence in cast-iron building construction. The five-story building was originally built as a warehouse for George Appold, a businessman with interests in the leather, real estate, and marine transport industries.
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

G. Krug and Sons
Architect unknown (Built around 1810)
For more than 170 years artisans at this site have hammered out practical and ornamental ironwork that still graces such local landmarks as Otterbein Methodist Church, the Basilica of the Assumption, Washington Monument, Zion Church, and the Baltimore Zoo. The modest beginnings of the shop date back to 1810, when farmers traveling to and from the market stopped to have their horses shod and their wagons repaired by blacksmith Andrew Schwatke. The business was transferred to Gustav A. Krug, a young Bavarian immigrant and ancestor of all the subsequent Krug family owners.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Gandy Belting Company Building
726-734 W. Pratt Street
Architect Unknown (1888)
The Gandy Belting Company (1888-1931) was transformative to the history of Baltimore’s important textile industry. It adapted the textile technologies of the early and mid-19th century to the manufacture of machinery belting for the transmission of power. Its patented belts were once widely known and used around the world. The company building was an integral part of a clearly defined district of manufacturing and warehouse buildings extending along the B&O Railroad tracks on West Pratt Street. The building has been converted into loft apartments.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Harry Guss, Inc. Building
419 W. Baltimore Street
Architect Unknown (Built around 1840)
This Federal-period dwelling was converted to commercial use in the last half of the 19th century; it was typical as formerly residential areas became absorbed by the expansion of the city’s commercial core. Its cast-iron storefront façade, most likely produced in a local foundry, represents a type of architecture which characterized commercial buildings in Baltimore in the period. The building is also significant for its association with the important garment manufacturing and sales industries which flourished in this area of Baltimore in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Hecht Company Building
118 N. Howard Street
Smith and May (1924)
The Hecht Company building illustrates the importance and influence of early-to-mid 20th-century commercial and retail activity in Baltimore. The building exemplifies how architecture accommodated the evolution of department store commerce. The Hecht Company building weaves together the history of three major department store companies: the Bernheimer-Leader Store, the Hecht Company, and the May Company. Several years after the Hecht Company permanently closed their downtown location the building was converted into apartments.
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Heiser, Rosenfeld, and Strauss Buildings
32-42 S. Paca Street
Parker & Thomas and others (1886-1905)
These three buildings have been combined and rehabilitated to serve as the Inner Harbor Lofts. The Heiser Building is a Romanesque Revival six-story brick, stone, and iron structure, built as a show factory in 1886. The Rosenfeld Building is a six-story building with Beaux Arts styling and built for E. Rosenfeld and Company in 1905. The Strauss Building is a six-story high loft structure built in 1887 for the Kinny Tobacco Company (cigarette manufacturers) and later occupied by clothing manufacturers Strauss Brothers before becoming part of the Rosenfeld complex around 1910. The buildings are significant for being vertical manufactories that were the engine of commercial Baltimore.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Hippodrome Theater (France-Merrick Performing Arts Center)
12 N. Eutaw Street
Thomas White Lamb (1914)
The Hippodrome Theater is historically significant both for its association with the performing arts and as an outstanding example of early 20th century theater design. The Hippodrome Theater was the premiere vaudeville theater of Baltimore, was one of its first motion picture theaters, and is one of an increasingly small number of remaining buildings in the western area of downtown Baltimore which reflect the neighborhood’s previous vitality as a commercial and entertainment center. Renovated in 2004, the Hippodrome is once again one of the city’s premier performance venues.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Hutzler's Palace & Tower Buildings
Palace: 210-218 N. Howard Street
Baldwin & Pennington (1888)
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Tower: 222 N. Howard Street
James R. Edmunds, Jr. (1932)
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

The Hutzler Brothers Company was a department store founded in Baltimore by Abram G. Hutzler in 1858. From its beginning as a small dry goods store at the corner of Howard and Baltimore City Landmarkay streets, Hutzler’s eventually grew into a chain of 10 department stores.

The Hutzler’s Palace Building is an exceptional example of Romanesque eBaltimore City Landmarkectic design, and no finer example of this late-19th-century style exists in Baltimore. Originally completed in 1888 to the designs of one of the city’s most important architectural firms of the period, the ground floor was redesigned with Art Moderne detailing as part of the 1931 expansion of the Hutzler’s complex. The ground floor visually and physically unites the Palace Building and the adjacent Hutzler’s Tower Building.

Hutzler’s Tower is one of the most important Art Deco buildings in Baltimore. The Moderne skyscraper is architecturally unique to our area. The interior is noteworthy and exemplifies store design of the era. The building is the first electrically welded, multistory structures in the city and was designed to enable the enlargement to ten stories, which occurred in 1941.

Johnston Building
26-30 S. Howard Street
Jackson Gott (1880)
This five-story loft building sports a cast-iron façade with Queen Anne style details. The building housed wholesale companies dealing in tobacco, hats, shoes, clothing, and home and office furnishings. It is a rare “double warehouse” building that was once home to the Samuel Hecht, Jr. & Sons Company, which later became significant retailer in Baltimore and the region.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Kresge Building
117 W. Lexington Street
Architect Unknown (1938)
The Kresge Building is significant as a very popular and well-noted example of the Art Deco or Moderne style. Located near Lexington Market, the building is comparable to the Hutzler’s building on Howard Street in Art Deco styling, simply on a smaller scale. The three-story corner structure consists of a 1938 Art Deco structure and a 1955 addition.
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

George Knipp & Brother Building (McCrory Store)
121 N. Howard Street
Architect Unknown (1875)
This five-story brick building is significant as a cast-iron fronted building. It was the location of John Knipps’ furniture business and his brother George Knipp’s enterprise in gas fixtures and plumbing supplies. The building served as home to a number of businesses (carpet sales, shoe repair) until 1929 when the J. G. McCrory store occupied this site and the adjacent buildings. The McCrory façade still hides the elaborate cast-iron front.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Lexington Market
400 W. Lexington Street
Architect Unknown (Built around 1950)
Baltimore’s best known public market was founded in 1782 on land leased by Revolutionary War hero John Eager Howard. Lexington Market is the city’s oldest and most iconic public market. The first structure was built on this hilltop site in 1803, and was expanded in subsequent years to consist of three rectangular, one-story, block-long sheds.  A fire destroyed these structures in 1949 but the market was quickly rebuilt. Today the market is a popular “foodie” destination to experience iconic Baltimore foods, including crab cakes, coddies, and Berger’s cookies.     

Lord Baltimore Hotel
20 W. Baltimore Street
William Lee Stoddart (1828)
The Lord Baltimore Hotel embodies the distinctive architectural characteristics of early 20th-century, high-rise hotels, reminiscent of such famous American hotels as New York's Vanderbilt Hotel and Chicago's Palmer House. Built in a transitional architectural period when classical design was being abandoned in favor of Art Deco and early modernism, the Lord Baltimore Hotel was the last high rise building constructed with classical ornamentation in downtown Baltimore. Constructed in the wake of the Baltimore Fire of 1904 that destroyed 63 acres of the downtown area, at the time it was the largest hotel building constructed in Maryland.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Maryland National Road
The Maryland National Road is part of a six-state National Scenic Byway that spans more than 700 miles from Baltimore through Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois to East St. Louis, Missouri. The road begins at the Inner Harbor, travelling along Lombard and Pratt streets west connecting with U.S. Route 40. Part of the United States’ first federally funded highway, the “Road that Built the Nation” linked the ships and wharves of Baltimore with industry and agriculture in the West.
STATE SCENIC BYWAY
ALL AMERICAN ROAD

N. Hess & Brother Building
409 W. Baltimore Street
Architect Unknown (Built around 1875)
This building, in addition to its neighbor at 407 W. Baltimore, is one of the few remaining cast-iron front buildings in the city. The building was most likely constructed by the Rieman family, who owned a wholesale grocery company. The boot and shoe factory of N. Hess and Brother occupied the building in 1876. Nathan Hess, shoemaker, immigrated from Germany in 1852 and began manufacturing shoes in Baltimore in 1872 in partnership with his brother Sol. Following the death of Nathan Hess in 1883, the Hess Shoes firm moved out of the building, and by 1898 Mendel Schwartz & Sons, wholesale clothiers, had become the occupants. In 1983, the property was joined with the adjacent 407 W. Baltimore Street.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

National Museum of Dentistry
31 S. Greene Street
George C. Haskell (1904)
Opened in 1996, the Dr. Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry, operated by the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, is a lively national center where visitors learn the importance of a healthy smile and the rich history of dentistry. Considered America's premier national museum dedicated to dental history, dentistry and oral health, the 7,000-square-foot exhibition space offers visitors an extraordinary array of historic artifacts and interactive exhibitions that inspire people to make healthy choices about oral health. Highlights include George Washington's ivory denture, Queen Victoria's personal dental instruments, and an extraordinary collection of toothbrushes ranging from the 1800s to the present.

John Latrobe House
11 E. Mulberry Street
Architect unknown (Built around 1800)
The home of John H.B. Latrobe House is the only surviving site associated with the writing contest that launched Edgar Allan Poe's literary career. In October 1833, Latrobe and others with the contest read Poe’s "Ms. Found in a Bottle" and unanimously declared him the winner. Poe, who was at the time a penniless unknown author, received a $50 cash prize. Perhaps more importantly, Poe struck up a friendship with one of the judges who would help jumpstart his literary career. For many years, the Latrobe House held the offices of furniture manufacturing company Fallon & Hellen. Today, it is a private residence and signifies a milestone in Poe’s career as an author.

Old Pine Street Station
214 Pine Street
Architect Unknown (1877)
This brick, two-story Victorian Gothic building served as a police station, once housing offices of the Western District.  At the time of its construction in 1877-1878, the station not only signified new civic programs to serve the demands created by the city’s burgeoning commercial development, but also reflected trends in civic and commercial architecture of the period. Today the building is a significant landmark as a result of its notable design and its setting along a well-traveled thoroughfare.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Old St. Paul's Cemetery
733 W. Redwood Street
Established around 1800
In the year 1800, the Vestry of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church purchased two contiguous parcels of land in Ridgely’s Delight to establish St. Paul’s Cemetery. Many of Baltimore’s most prominent early citizens were buried in this cemetery including Revolutionary War hero John Eager Howard and Samuel Chase, one of Maryland’s four signers of the Declaration of Independence. Francis Scott Key and Tench Tilghman, General Washington’s aide de camp, were buried here until 1860. The cemetery also yields important information about burial customs, death rate, infant mortality, funerary art and local history, particularly in the early 19th century. The cemetery has improved considerably since its decline in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and has become a showplace that serves as an excellent example of preservation of an urban cemetery.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Oriole Park at Camden Yards
333 W. Camden Street
Populous (HOK Sports) (1989-92)
The beloved home to the Baltimore Orioles was the first of the “retro” designed major league ballparks. The great success of Camden sparked a trend in the construction of more traditional, fan-friendly ballparks in downtown locations across the nation. The ballpark is located on land that was once a railyard for the B&O Railroad.

Pascault Row
651-665 W. Lexington Street
William F. Small (Built around 1816)
Pascault Row represents an important phase in the evolution of the rowhouse: the transition from Federal style into the early Greek Revival period. The eight 3-½ story brick dwellings are of rather heroic proportions for early rowhouses and feature gracefully placed architectural elements. These buildings are associated with many prominent early Baltimoreans including Louis Pascault, an influential early merchant who built the eight houses on part of his estate, known as “Chatsworth,” and General Columbus O’Donnell, the husband of Pascault’s daughter Eleanora and son of John O’Donnell, founder of the Canton Company.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Provident Bank of Maryland (Masjid us Salaam)
240 N. Howard Street
Joseph Evans Sperry and York & Sawyer (1903)
The Provident Bank Building is probably the finest example of the Second Renaissance Revival style in Baltimore. Designed to resemble Italian palaces, this massive structure bears a remarkable similarity to Dahlgren Hall at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis. Provident Savings Bank was chartered in 1886 to encourage “thrift and providence” among wage earners whose small deposits had not been sought after by the existing banks. Today the building is home to the Masjid us Salaam.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Read's Drug Store
N. Howard and W. Lexington streets
Smith and May (1934)
One of the Baltimore’s least well-known but most important stories is the history of the former Read’s Drug Store and its important role in Baltimore’s civil rights movement. Built in 1934 by Baltimore architects Smith and May, the press heralded this Art Deco structure as a local landmark from its beginning—a modern flagship store for the Read’s chain, continuing their 50-year presence at the bustling heart of the downtown retail district.

Like many downtown commercial establishments in the early 1950s, the Read’s chain maintained a strict policy of racial segregation at their lunch counters. In 1955, a group of Morgan State College students came together with the leadership of the recently organized Baltimore Committee on Racial Equality to organize a sit-in protest at the lunch counter of the Read’s Drug Store at Howard and Lexington Streets. They succeeded in this effort, marking this building as a witness to the first successful student-led sit-in protest in Baltimore. Their success provided a defining and powerful model for the more famous lunch-counter sit-in of Greensboro, North Carolina in 1960.

Although the famous lunch counter is now gone, the building’s facades still retain the original Art Deco styling. The building future is in question due to various failures in redeveloping the old drug store and other nearby historic structures.

Site summary courtesy of Baltimore Heritage, Inc.

Rieman Block
617-631 W. Lexington Street
Architect unknown (Built around 1880)
The Rieman Block is significant architecturally as an example of a type of 19th century urban structure that is unusual for the Lexington Market area. In the years following the Civil War, this section of the city was primarily residential but rapidly transforming into a commercial center. While new buildings were generally simple, the Rieman Block stands out because it is elaborate. The structure also achieves significance from its association with Joseph Rieman, a real estate developer and member of the boards of several corporations.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Sanitary Laundry Company Building
118-120 N. Paca Street
Architect Unknown (1883)
This building has a cast-iron storefront at street level, while the upper façade is characterized by elaborate decorative brickwork and terra cotta ornament reflecting the influence of the Queen Anne style of the 1880s.  Its original function was as a slaughterhouse and meat packing plant, and continued in this use until 1897, when it was converted to a commercial laundry.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

St. Jude Shrine
512 W. Saratoga Street
John Lewis Hayes (1846)
The Greek Revival style church was originally built for a Baptist congregation and was home to other congregations until 1917 when the Pallottine Fathers moved to this sanctuary. The fathers host visitors attending mass and novenas as well as offer prayers to St. Jude from requests received via mail, phone, and the Internet.

St. Paul's Rectory
24 W. Saratoga Street
Architect unknown (1789-91)
The rectory of Old St. Paul’s Church is one of the oldest houses in the city whose date can be authenticated. Logic, proportion, and elegant understatement characterize its design and render it an outstanding example of the Georgian Period. The home was built for Dr. William West, a native of Virginia and former neighbor of George Washington. West died before the building was complete and the Reverend J. G. J. Bend became the first in the line of locally influential clergy who occupied it. In 1808, the House of Bishops met in the Rectory. Francis Scott Key was a frequent visitor. More recently the building served as offices for Preservation Maryland, a state advocacy organization. Recently it was announced that Old St. Paul’s will again use the rectory for church offices.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Stewart’s Department Store
226-232 W. Lexington Street
Charles Cassell (1889)
This six-story building at Howard and Lexington streets served as the flagship store for the Baltimore-based retail chain. Stewart’s Department Store is significant for its importance to the development of retailing in downtown Baltimore between 1899 and 1945 and is also stands out as an excellent example of major urban department store.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Swiss Steam Laundry Building
100-102 N. Greene Street
Architect Unknown (1895)
The Swiss Steam Laundry Building is a six-story loft Romanesque building that is architecturally significant as an excellent example of the loft type building. It is also noted for association with a period in Baltimore’s history when the city was a national leader in the manufacture of ready-to-wear clothing. In the second half of the 19th century and into the early 20th, Baltimore ranked among the country’s leading industrial cities, with clothing manufacture being the major industry in the metropolitan district. Most of this manufacturing took place in the loft district, about three blocks to the south of the Swiss Steam Laundry Building. As a manufacturers’ laundry, the Swiss Steam Laundry and its successor, the Elite Laundry, played a significant role in the clothing industry.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

Westminster Hall and Burying Ground
509-513 W. Fayette Street
Gates: Maximilien Godefroy (1820)
Church: Dixon, Balbirnie & Dixon (1852)
Originally called the Western Burying Ground, the land for this cemetery and church was purchased by the Presbyterians in 1787 from Revolutionary War hero Col. John Eager Howard. It contains the graves of many of this city’s earliest and most distinguished citizens. Among these are the first mayor, James Calhoun, and General Samuel Smith, defender of the city during the War of 1812. Of national importance is the tomb of Edgar Allan Poe, which was erected by the schoolchildren of Baltimore. In 1820, Maximilien Godefroy designed the gates in the Egyptian style. The church was built in 1852 to fulfill the requirements of a city ordinance which required every cemetery to contain a building. For lack of space, it was erected on piers over some of the graves.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
BALTIMORE CITY LANDMARK

Wilkens-Robin Building
308-312 W. Pratt Street
Bartlett-Hayward (1871)
The Wilkens-Robins Building is one of the few remaining cast-iron fronted buildings in the city and an excellent example of a technology of building in transition. By the 1870s the city had become an important center of cast-iron construction and several important foundries exported the architectural facades across the country. After the Civil War, cast-iron fronted buildings were commonly erected in the expanding central business district. Most were destroyed in the Great Fire of 1904 and the remaining ones have gradually been torn down. This building is also a fine illustration of the way in which formal aesthetic principles were translated into what was the world’s first industrialized, factory-produced building material.
LISTED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

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